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Hands are holding a cell phone that is displaying an image of the Harvard Art Museums' website homepage.

Harvard Art Museums from Home

Everything you need for a virtual visit to the museums—online events, audio and video offerings, activity books to download, and more.

A color photograph captures a target range in a desert landscape. A row of nine targets aligns with the horizon. Each features a human figure silhouetted in dark gray. In the foreground, thousands of dark red and turquoise shell casings are scattered amid the dusty beige rocks and pebbles of the desert earth, while grasses in shades of brown, yellow, and green fill the middle ground. An open sky in shades of hazy blue provides a backdrop for the scene.

Connecting with Communities: Migration

Read this second installment in our series of articles featuring Harvard Latinx students from María Luisa Parra-Velasco’s course Connecting with Communities reflecting on works in the Harvard Art Museums.

A blue-saturated photograph of a desert landscape at night with a winding road in the foreground and mountains in the background. A blue-saturated photograph of a desert landscape at night with a winding road in the foreground and mountains in the background. In large white letters at the top are the words “Devour the Land” and text at the bottom reads “War and American Landscape Photography since 1970” and “September 17, 2021–¬January 16, 2022.”

Devour the Land: An Introduction

Curator Makeda Best, alongside commentary from photographers Nina Berman, Sharon Stewart, and Robert Del Tredici, briefly introduces the Devour the Land exhibition.

A black and white photograph shows an older man with white hair and dark skin seated in front of a wooden door with a small rectangular window. He is wearing a light-colored zip-up jacket and a dark-colored apron. He stares directly at the viewer, his large hands folded neatly on his lap. “Mr. Johnson,” “’65,” and the artist’s signature are scribbled in the bottom margin of the photograph.

Connecting with Communities: Latinx Foodways

Harvard undergraduate Latinx students from María Luisa Parra-Velasco’s course Connecting with Communities reflect on works in the Harvard Art Museums alongside their own personal and professional experiences.

This image shows a split screen. On the left, a woman wearing a black apron sits at a worktable with woodcut blocks and prints. On the right, there are two color prints of a woman’s face in three-quarter profile with a shoreline behind her.

Art Talk: Edvard Munch’s Jigsaw Woodcut Technique

Conservator and printmaker Christina Taylor demonstrates the jigsaw woodcut printing technique that artist Edvard Munch used to create two colorful prints.

A black and white photograph shows a close-up view of two people seated in a booth at a diner. They are nearly in silhouette, their faces lit mostly by light from a large window just beyond the table. At right, a man smiles faintly, resting one elbow on the table, while holding a spoon with his other hand. Across the table, a woman in a sweater, wearing a knit cap over her curly hair, reaches one arm toward the window, looking intently as she draws on it with her finger, tracing curling lines in the condensation.

Art Talk: Reframing Photographic Histories at the Harvard Art Museums

Curator Makeda Best explores the history of photography collecting at Harvard and her work to foreground new perspectives and interpretations.

This split-screen image shows two sides of a realistic sculpture of a boar. On the left is a frontal view; on the right is a side view.

Creature Feature: Heroes and Hogs in Ancient Greece

Ph.D. candidate Sarah Eisen explores how pigs and wild boar challenged ancient Greek heroes like Odysseus and Herakles.

This digital rendering includes photographs of stone wall carvings. The rendering shows a corner of the room where two walls meet. The wall on the left has an arched doorway, and above it, a row of repeated carvings of a seated figure. To the right of the door, in the corner, is a carving of a standing robed figure. In the same corner is a slightly larger robed standing figure, in high relief on a pedestal. Just to the right of that figure is an even larger robed figure, also in high relief, of a seated Buddha, on a lotus leaf–patterned pedestal.

Art Talk: Reframing the Tianlongshan Cave Temple Fragments

Curator Sarah Laursen investigates fragments from China’s Tianlongshan cave temples and new efforts to uncover their recent history and original context.

This image shows a split screen. On the left, a woman wearing a black apron sits at a worktable with several woodcut prints in front of her. They show abstracted orange-hued nude figures on the shore of a pond, with green foliage behind them. The right side is an enlarged view of one of the prints, and it is set against a black background. A signature is at bottom right.

Art Talk: Ernst Ludwig Kirchner’s Color Woodcut Technique

Christina Taylor demonstrates the color woodcut printing technique Ernst Ludwig Kirchner used to create the dynamic print Bathers Tossing Reeds.

A silver stirrup cup in the shape of a fox head. Its eyes are wide open and its ears perked up.

Creature Feature: What Does the Fox Say?

Discover a fantastic silver cup in the shape of a fox head, and find out how our team made it “float” while on display.