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Hands are holding a cell phone that is displaying an image of the Harvard Art Museums' website homepage.

Harvard Art Museums from Home

Everything you need for a virtual visit to the museums—online events, audio and video offerings, activity books to download, and more.
These split screen images show, at left, a woman at a worktable wearing a black apron and holding a colorful abstract print, and at right, an image of three small prints, with a “plus” sign between two at the top and an equal sign above the one at the bottom.

Art Talk: Demonstrating Picasso’s Reduction Linocut Technique

Conservator and printmaker Christina Taylor demonstrates the reduction linocut printing technique pioneered by artist Pablo Picasso and master printer Hidalgo Arnéra.

A color print portrays a portrait bust of a light-skinned woman set in an oval frame. The woman wears a pink robe, white veil, and a gold jeweled crown as she turns her head to gaze out at the viewer. The background of the frame is black.

Carve, Reverse, Reflect: Émira Sergent Marceau’s Printmaking and the French Revolution

Printmaker Sarah Lund brings female artist Émira Sergent Marceau to life in this narrative about how, despite political limitations placed on women at the time, Marceau created art in the midst of revolution.

By Sarah Lund

A color photograph shows a woman in a green bikini reclining on a wooden lounge chair on the beach. The image is cropped above her knees and at her nose so that only her lips and torso are visible. Her skin is an iridescent bronze tone. She is wearing a gold necklace around her neck and many gold bracelets on her wrists, as well as several rings on her fingers. Her right hand is wrapped around an aluminum can. A white beach towel lays crumpled on the ground next to her chair.

Connecting with Communities: Justice, Equity, and Inclusion

Read this final installment in our series of articles featuring Harvard Latinx students from María Luisa Parra-Velasco’s course Connecting with Communities reflecting on works in the Harvard Art Museums.

This installation shot shows part of a gallery with light gray walls and a brown wood floor. On the two visible walls hang eleven framed paintings. In the center of the floor stands a square-shaped wooden table; atop it are three porcelain objects within a vitrine.

Reflecting on Art Museums and the Legacies of the Dutch Slave Trade

How can museums—themselves so often enmeshed with histories of slavery, colonization, and white supremacy—be mobilized for racial justice?

By Sarah Mallory, Kéla Jackson, Rachel Burke, Joanna Sheers Seidenstein

This composite image shows three horses grazing in the rolling hills of an open pasture. The left half of the image, which shows a horse in the foreground and part of another horse, is a full-color painting. The horses are reddish in color, and the surrounding landscape includes greens, reds, and blues. The image continues on the right side in black and white outline and shows the rest of one horse and another one leaning down to eat grass.

Coloring German Expressionism

The Harvard Art Museums have produced a coloring book about German expressionism for adults—kids can join in the fun as well!

A color photograph captures a target range in a desert landscape. A row of nine targets aligns with the horizon. Each features a human figure silhouetted in dark gray. In the foreground, thousands of dark red and turquoise shell casings are scattered amid the dusty beige rocks and pebbles of the desert earth, while grasses in shades of brown, yellow, and green fill the middle ground. An open sky in shades of hazy blue provides a backdrop for the scene.

Connecting with Communities: Migration

Read this second installment in our series of articles featuring Harvard Latinx students from María Luisa Parra-Velasco’s course Connecting with Communities reflecting on works in the Harvard Art Museums.

A blue-saturated photograph of a desert landscape at night with a winding road in the foreground and mountains in the background. A blue-saturated photograph of a desert landscape at night with a winding road in the foreground and mountains in the background. In large white letters at the top are the words “Devour the Land” and text at the bottom reads “War and American Landscape Photography since 1970” and “September 17, 2021–¬January 16, 2022.”

Devour the Land: An Introduction

Curator Makeda Best, alongside commentary from photographers Nina Berman, Sharon Stewart, and Robert Del Tredici, briefly introduces the Devour the Land exhibition.

A black and white photograph shows an older man with white hair and dark skin seated in front of a wooden door with a small rectangular window. He is wearing a light-colored zip-up jacket and a dark-colored apron. He stares directly at the viewer, his large hands folded neatly on his lap. “Mr. Johnson,” “’65,” and the artist’s signature are scribbled in the bottom margin of the photograph.

Connecting with Communities: Latinx Foodways

Harvard undergraduate Latinx students from María Luisa Parra-Velasco’s course Connecting with Communities reflect on works in the Harvard Art Museums alongside their own personal and professional experiences.

This image shows a split screen. On the left, a woman wearing a black apron sits at a worktable with woodcut blocks and prints. On the right, there are two color prints of a woman’s face in three-quarter profile with a shoreline behind her.

Art Talk: Edvard Munch’s Jigsaw Woodcut Technique

Conservator and printmaker Christina Taylor demonstrates the jigsaw woodcut printing technique that artist Edvard Munch used to create two colorful prints.

A color screenshot shows two images: one on top and one on bottom. The top image shows a light-skinned woman with short brown hair in black-frame glasses in front of a small landscape painting, and the bottom frame shows a light-skinned man in front of a green bookcase filled with books.

@busch_hall Conversations: Lynette Roth and Joseph Leo Koerner

The Busch-Reisinger Museum’s new Instagram account @busch_hall hosts conversations with established and emerging scholars, contemporary artists, and museum peers on Instagram Live.