Designing Painting Edo

March 16, 2021
Elie Glyn, assistant director for exhibitions, discusses the design of Painting Edo and the inspiration behind the display of large folding screens, such as Soga Shōhaku’s Race at Uji River, c. 1764, seen here. Photo: John Neely.

Exhibition designer Elie Glyn outlines the inspirations and considerations behind tailoring a space to celebrate the aesthetics of Painting Edo: Japanese Art from the Feinberg Collection. This design is meant to provide a respite from the hectic nature of contemporary life. 

If you’d like to know more, you can also learn about Glyn’s creative process around the display of framed fans in the exhibition, in Art Talk: Setting the Fans Afloat

Painting Edo: Japanese Art from the Feinberg Collection—the largest exhibition ever presented at the Harvard Art Museums—offers a window onto the supremely rich visual culture of Japan’s early modern era. Take a virtual tour on Google Arts & Culture and visit our Painting Edo page to discover more ways to experience this special exhibition.

Led by:
Elie Glyn, Assistant Director for Exhibitions, Collections Management 

Works explored:
The Four Accomplishments, Japanese, Edo period, early 18th century. Pair of six-panel folding screens; ink, color, and gold on paper. Promised gift of Robert S. and Betsy G. Feinberg, TL41555.1.

Soga Shōhaku, Race at Uji River, Japanese, Edo period, c. 1764. Six-panel folding screen; ink, color, and gold on paper. Promised gift of Robert S. and Betsy G. Feinberg, TL42147.30.

Sakai Hōitsu, Birds and Flowers of the Twelve Months, Japanese, Edo period, c. 1820–28. Set of 12 hanging scrolls; ink, color, and gold on silk. Promised gift of Robert S. and Betsy G. Feinberg, TL42096.14.