Precision and Prestige: The Arts of Engraving

, Fogg Art Museum, Harvard University Art Museums
  • Constant Window
  • Jan de Pap
  • Crucifixion
  • Void
  • Wings of the Ocean
  • Untitled
  • The Dead Christ on the Cross
  • Philipp Melanchthon
  • The Tiburtine Sibyl Showing the Vision of the Virgin to Emperor Augustus
  • Madonna of the Chair
  • Satellite II
  • Satellite
  • New Old Town
  • The Drowned Woman
  • Portrait of Louis Roupert
  • Angel of the Annunciation
  • Third Day: The Separation of Land and Sea
  • On the Red Danube
  • Descent from the Cross
  • Moor Claimed -- A Yorkshire Farmhouse
  • Self-Analysis
  • Christ Crucified
  • The Circumcision
  • Deposition from the cross
  • Judgement of Paris
  • The Battle of Anghiari
  • Battle of the sea gods: left half of a frieze
  • Virgin with the Long Thigh
  • John Hyde
  • Abraham Lincoln (1809-1865), Sixteenth President of the U.S. (1861-1865)
  • Composition: White on White
  • The Battle of Anghiari
  • Bonaparte Crossing the Alps
  • Saint Benedict in Ecstasy
  • Saint Eustace
  • Houses with Figure
  • Abraham Lincoln
  • Temperance
  • The Virgin and Child with Saint Anne at the Cradle
  • Theseus Seated on the Conquered Minotaur
  • Charles I of England with the Duke of Hamilton
  • Bust of a Woman with a Cap
  • Virgin of the Annunciation
  • Coat-of-Arms with a Skull
  • Arabesque with Triton and Two Infant Fauns
  • Scaraboid Engraved Gem with Wreathed and Helmeted Head
  • Bally-burgh Ness
Fogg Art Museum, Harvard University Art Museums

This exhibition will show examples of engraving, which was the printmaking technique of the highest status from the 15th through the 19th centuries and yet is now practically extinct. Examples of engraving as a craft and as a fine art will be presented, with attention paid to the function of the technique, the syntax of its graphic systems, and the relationship of technique to expression. The exhibition includes not only masterpieces by artists ranging from Dürer to Picasso, but also stock certificates, scientific instruments, and maps, to show more mundane applications of engraving.

Organized by four students—Johanna Richardson and Suzanne Gauron, Harvard Class of 2001; Nenita Elphick, Ph.D. candidate in the Department of History of Art and Architecture; and Maya Benton, Ed.M. candidate in the Graduate School of Education—under the guidance of Marjorie B. Cohn, Carl A. Weyerhaeuser Curator of Prints, Fogg Art Museum.