Photo © President and Fellows of Harvard College
Identification and Creation
Object Number
1992.256.33
Title
Miniature Ram or Goat Pendant
Classification
Jewelry
Work Type
pendant
Date
10th-8th century BCE
Places
Creation Place: Ancient & Byzantine World, Asia
Period
Iron Age
Culture
Near Eastern
Persistent Link
https://hvrd.art/o/304263
Physical Descriptions
Medium
Bronze
Technique
Cast, lost-wax process
Dimensions
2.4 x 2.9 x 1.3 cm (15/16 x 1 1/8 x 1/2 in.)
Technical Details

Chemical Composition: ICP-MS/AAA data from sample, Bronze:
Cu, 90.3; Sn, 8; Pb, 0.72; Zn, 0.014; Fe, 0.19; Ni, 0.18; Ag, 0.06; Sb, 0.15; As, 0.38; Bi, less than 0.025; Co, 0.015; Au, less than 0.01; Cd, less than 0.001
J. Riederer

Technical Observations: The patina is mainly green with some cupritic red and white accretions. The surface is somewhat distorted by corrosion and preserves traces of some kind of pseudomorph on the proper right shoulder.

This pendant is a solid lost-wax cast from a model made directly in the wax. The suspension hole was created in the wax, causing a slight hump on the back. The protruding eyes were probably made by sticking small lumps of wax onto the face of the wax model.


Francesca G. Bewer (submitted 2012)

Provenance
Louise M. and George E. Bates, Camden, ME (by 1971-1992), gift; to the Harvard University Art Museums, 1992.
Acquisition and Rights
Credit Line
Harvard Art Museums/Arthur M. Sackler Museum, Gift of Louise M. and George E. Bates
Accession Year
1992
Object Number
1992.256.33
Division
Asian and Mediterranean Art
Contact
am_asianmediterranean@harvard.edu
The Harvard Art Museums encourage the use of images found on this website for personal, noncommercial use, including educational and scholarly purposes. To request a higher resolution file of this image, please submit an online request.
Descriptions
Description
This pendant is in the form of a stylized ram standing frontally. The ram has two downward-curving horns. Its head is small and bean-shaped, with raised circles for the eyes. Two raised bands encircle the long neck. The legs are simple and thin, tapering to points. There is a transverse hole through the body for suspension rather than a loop. The tail rises up, then curves downward.
Subjects and Contexts

Ancient Bronzes

Related Works

This record has been reviewed by the curatorial staff but may be incomplete. Our records are frequently revised and enhanced. For more information please contact the Division of Asian and Mediterranean Art at am_asianmediterranean@harvard.edu