Photo © President and Fellows of Harvard College
Identification and Creation
Object Number
2008.48.1
People
Richard Diebenkorn, American (Portland, OR 1922 - 1993 Berkeley, CA)
Lilah Toland, American
Crown Point Press
Title
#1, from Five Aquatints with Drypoint
Classification
Prints
Work Type
print
Date
1978
Culture
American
Persistent Link
https://hvrd.art/o/6933
Physical Descriptions
Medium
Lift ground aquatint with burnishing on white wove paper
Technique
Aquatint
Dimensions
plate: 27.6 x 19.6 cm (10 7/8 x 7 11/16 in.)
sheet: 47.8 x 32.9 cm (18 13/16 x 12 15/16 in.)
Inscriptions and Marks
  • Signed: lower right margin in graphite pencil: RD 78
  • inscription: lower margin, graphite pencil, signed, in artist's hand: 28/35 #1 RD 78
  • chop: lower right corner, compression: Crown Point Press / Lilah Toland
State, Edition, Standard Reference Number
Edition
28/35
Acquisition and Rights
Credit Line
Harvard Art Museums/Fogg Museum, Gift of Ann B. Goodman
Accession Year
2008
Object Number
2008.48.1
Division
Modern and Contemporary Art
Contact
am_moderncontemporary@harvard.edu
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Descriptions
Commentary
The four prints (2008.48.1-4) are from Diebenkorn's 1978 portfolio Five Aquatints with Drypoint, published by Crown Point Press. Diebenkorn began sporadically making prints in the early 60s, often turning to printmaking during breaks from painting, and became the first artist published by Crown Point Press. Beginning with his 1977 portfolio of nine prints and continuing in this 1978 portfolio one sees Diebenkorn's movement away from representation to an interest in more formal, abstract compositions in his prints. They are experimental in nature (Diebenkorn often reworked the plates by scraping, burnishing, and adding drypoint lines), and show an exploration of planar and linear relationships, textural variety of linear marks, and contrasts of tonal values. Numbered in the order in which they were made, each print in this group can be viewed singularly. However, they become even more powerful when studied as a series, as a relationship from one composition to the next becomes evident.
Related Works

This record has been reviewed by the curatorial staff but may be incomplete. Our records are frequently revised and enhanced. For more information please contact the Division of Modern and Contemporary Art at am_moderncontemporary@harvard.edu