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Gallery Text

Koryŏ Celadon

Celadon is a term that originated in Europe; in Korea, it is called ch’ŏngja, or “green ware.” Produced primarily for the royal court and elite class, Koryŏ celadon was prized in China, where celadon was first manufactured, and coveted and collected in Japan.

Inlaid celadon was a major Korean innovation: the design was carved into the surface and filled with slip, creating white and/or black patterns under the green glaze. An elegant and subtle color palette and decoration characterize the best of Koryŏ celadon.

Identification and Creation
Object Number
2014.187
Title
Large Bowl with Stylized Floral Design
Classification
Vessels
Work Type
vessel
Date
late 12th – early 13th century
Places
Creation Place: East Asia, Korea
Period
Koryŏ dynasty, 918-1392
Culture
Korean
Persistent Link
https://hvrd.art/o/59004
Physical Descriptions
Medium
Stoneware with celadon glaze over reverse-inlaid decoration
Dimensions
H. 10.8 x W. 19.5 x D. 16.5 cm (4 1/4 x 7 11/16 x 6 1/2 in.)
Provenance
[Soshiro Yabumoto, Tokyo, (by late 1960s)], sold; to Sylvan Barnet and William Burto, Cambridge, MA, (late 1960s-2014), gift from Sylvan Barnet and bequest from William Burto; to the Harvard Art Museums, 2014.
Acquisition and Rights
Credit Line
Harvard Art Museums/Arthur M. Sackler Museum, Gift of Sylvan Barnet and William Burto
Accession Year
2014
Object Number
2014.187
Division
Asian and Mediterranean Art
Contact
am_asianmediterranean@harvard.edu
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This record has been reviewed by the curatorial staff but may be incomplete. Our records are frequently revised and enhanced. For more information please contact the Division of Asian and Mediterranean Art at am_asianmediterranean@harvard.edu