Photo © President and Fellows of Harvard College
Gallery Text

Envisioned as a parody of marketing campaigns, Chung’s portfolio addresses how increasing tourism in the Caribbean has obscured the legacy of colonization and slavery. The disembodied portraits of vendors and agricultural workers are based on archival photographs of emancipated individuals in 19th-century Jamaica. Leveraging the weight of the printing press as a metaphor for the resilience of day laborers, Chung imprinted their silhouettes using a debossing technique, heat-pressed into the paper to create indentations. Each figure wields the tools of their respective trade, but their legibility is compromised via cropping, amplification, and pixilation to disrupt associations with sleek advertisements.

Each lithograph features quotations found in popular travel magazines. However, Chung, of Jamaican and Trinidadian descent and Afro-Chinese heritage, is also inspired by Indigenous linguistic traditions. One caption in the local dialect of Jamaican Patois expresses the speaker’s private delight in teaching foreigners colloquial phrases, but never directives such as “Go back to work.”

Identification and Creation
Object Number
2018.33.4.4
People
Andrea Chung, American (Newark, NJ born 1978)
Title
And fortunately, completely unchanged
Classification
Prints
Work Type
print
Date
2010
Culture
American
Persistent Link
https://hvrd.art/o/361183
Location
Level 3, Room 3500, Special Exhibitions Gallery
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Physical Descriptions
Medium
Debossed offset lithograph on white wove paper
Technique
Offset print
Dimensions
55.9 × 38.1 cm (22 × 15 in.)
Inscriptions and Marks
  • Signed: l.r., in graphite: AC 2010
  • watermark: right bottom edge: Watermark: somerset / ENGLAND
  • inscription: l.l., in graphite: 6/22
Provenance
Andrea Chung, created 2010; [Brandywine Workshop, Philadelphia, PA], sold; to the Harvard Art Museums, 2018.
State, Edition, Standard Reference Number
Edition
6/22
Acquisition and Rights
Credit Line
Harvard Art Museums/Fogg Museum, Margaret Fisher Fund
Copyright
© Andrea Chung
Accession Year
2018
Object Number
2018.33.4.4
Division
Modern and Contemporary Art
Contact
am_moderncontemporary@harvard.edu
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Publication History

Annie Paul, "Not Slavish Reproductions", The Gradient

Exhibition History

Prints from the Brandywine Workshop and Archives: Creative Communities, Harvard Art Museums, Cambridge, 03/04/2022 - 07/31/2022

Related Works

This record has been reviewed by the curatorial staff but may be incomplete. Our records are frequently revised and enhanced. For more information please contact the Division of Modern and Contemporary Art at am_moderncontemporary@harvard.edu