Photo © President and Fellows of Harvard College
Identification and Creation
Object Number
2009.98
People
Liliana Porter, Argentinian (Buenos Aires, Argentina born 1941)
Title
Tear
Classification
Prints
Work Type
print
Date
1972
Culture
Argentinian
Persistent Link
https://hvrd.art/o/333365
Physical Descriptions
Medium
Screen print on off-white wove paper with tear
Technique
Screen print
Dimensions
sheet: 57.2 x 76.2 cm (22 1/2 x 30 in.)
Inscriptions and Marks
  • inscription: l.r. in pencil: Liliana Porter 72
  • inscription: l.m. in pencil: 33/50
Provenance
Liliana Porter sold through [Hosfelt Gallery]; Harvard Art Museum
State, Edition, Standard Reference Number
Edition
33/50
Acquisition and Rights
Credit Line
Harvard Art Museums/Fogg Museum, Margaret Fisher Fund
Copyright
© Liliana Porter
Accession Year
2009
Object Number
2009.98
Division
Modern and Contemporary Art
Contact
am_moderncontemporary@harvard.edu
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Descriptions
Commentary
First, as part of the printmaking group New York Graphic Workshop, and then on her own, Porter has been one of the most influential artists of her generation to emerge from Latin America. These prints, both done in 1972, are reminiscent of her work and ideas during her time in the New York Graphic Workshop that disbanded only 2 years prior. Her interest was, and still is, in the relationship between the reality of an object and its representation. Her art is about invention of perception and her belief that all that is real in the viewer's relation to the object. At the time she believed that photography was the most objective medium, and used it for the foundation of her screen prints as can be seen in Hook. Although she worked to alter the definition of printmaking from the contact of the plate with paper to the act of making an edition, the objective was always about the art. The technique, in the end, was the tool that produced the idea.

This record has been reviewed by the curatorial staff but may be incomplete. Our records are frequently revised and enhanced. For more information please contact the Division of Modern and Contemporary Art at am_moderncontemporary@harvard.edu