No Image
Identification and Creation
Object Number
M26528
People
Glenn Ligon, American (Bronx, NY born 1960)
Title
Pictures at an Exhibition
Other Titles
Series/Book Title: The Paper Sculpture Show
Classification
Prints
Work Type
print
Date
2003
Culture
American
Persistent Link
https://hvrd.art/o/31246
Physical Descriptions
Medium
Offset photolithograph on two sheets of thin card stock
Technique
Photolithograph
Dimensions
sheet: 34 x 24.8 cm (13 3/8 x 9 3/4 in.)
Provenance
Narayan and Natasha Khandekar, gift; to Harvard University Art Museums, June 28, 2005.
Acquisition and Rights
Credit Line
Harvard Art Museums/Fogg Museum, Gift of Narayan and Natasha Khandekar
Copyright
© Glenn Ligon
Accession Year
2005
Object Number
M26528
Division
Modern and Contemporary Art
Contact
am_moderncontemporary@harvard.edu
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Descriptions
Commentary
This print is part of the Paper Sculpture Show. What the Paper Sculpture Show consists of is seventy-seven sheets of paper, by thirty artists (including two persons working together as a single "artist"), who have each created a sculpture that is to be cut out from one to four sheets of paper and assembled by a gallery visitor. The sheets were intended to be taken away from the gallery, that is, the paper sculpture show could occur in three dimensions in any space anywhere; but in the several exhibition venues where the sheets were available, the sculptures were made up and could be viewed as completed works of art. We already have a portfolio issued in 1995 in a large edition by The Sculpture Center in New York, in which sculptors make two-dimensional distillations of their sculptural aesthetic. "The Paper Sculpture Show" takes the process much further, and is more akin to the 1968 SMS portfolios, also in our collection, where offset photolithographic "things" -- some of which requiring assembly -- are bundled together, to be unpacked by the owners of the portfolios wherever they please . Fluxus boxes, while not usually requiring any assembly on the part of their owner, also require participation, even performance. SMS and Fluxus are essentially movements of the late 1960s; the Paper Sculpture show is their grandchild.
Related Works

This record has been reviewed by the curatorial staff but may be incomplete. Our records are frequently revised and enhanced. For more information please contact the Division of Modern and Contemporary Art at am_moderncontemporary@harvard.edu