Photo © President and Fellows of Harvard College
Identification and Creation
Object Number
1932.56.131
Title
Tripod Stand
Classification
Furniture
Work Type
stand
Date
n.d.
Places
Creation Place: Unidentified Region
Period
Modern
Culture
Unidentified culture
Persistent Link
https://hvrd.art/o/303983
Physical Descriptions
Medium
Brass
Technique
Cast
Dimensions
22.6 cm (8 7/8 in.)
Technical Details

Chemical Composition: ICP-MS/AAA data from sample, Brass:
Cu, 70.58; Sn, less than 0.25; Pb, 1.78; Zn, 27.48; Fe, 0.05; Ni, 0.01; Ag, 0.08; Sb, less than 0.02; As, less than 0.10; Bi, less than 0.025; Co, less than 0.005; Au, less than 0.01; Cd, 0.017

J. Riederer

Technical Observations: The surface is metallic with some brown and green. The tripod stand appears to be a modern fabrication, as there is little evidence indicating antiquity. Modern tool marks from drawing the rods and wires, filing, and soldering are visible on the surfaces. Holes on the top of each leg are irregularly shaped but show turn lines inside. An isolated area on the underside of one of the top wires has pitting and some corrosion products inside, but even these could be modern.


Carol Snow and Nina Vinogradskaya (submitted 2002)

Provenance
Dr. Harris Kennedy, Milton, MA (by 1932), gift; to the William Hayes Fogg Art Museum, 1932.
Acquisition and Rights
Credit Line
Harvard Art Museums/Arthur M. Sackler Museum, Gift of Dr. Harris Kennedy, Class of 1894
Accession Year
1932
Object Number
1932.56.131
Division
Asian and Mediterranean Art
Contact
am_asianmediterranean@harvard.edu
The Harvard Art Museums encourage the use of images found on this website for personal, noncommercial use, including educational and scholarly purposes. To request a higher resolution file of this image, please submit an online request.
Descriptions
Description
This tripod is not ancient. The three legs are circular-sectioned rods, joined at the top with sections of interlocking bent and twisted wire. Slightly more than half way down the legs, they are joined by three circular-sectioned wires that are soldered in place.

This record has been reviewed by the curatorial staff but may be incomplete. Our records are frequently revised and enhanced. For more information please contact the Division of Asian and Mediterranean Art at am_asianmediterranean@harvard.edu