Photo © President and Fellows of Harvard College
Identification and Creation
Object Number
1949.4
People
Rembrandt Harmensz. van Rijn, Dutch (Leiden 1606 - 1669 Amsterdam)
Title
Three Studies of a Child and One of a Woman
Classification
Drawings
Work Type
drawing
Date
c. 1638-40
Culture
Dutch
Persistent Link
https://hvrd.art/o/303699
Physical Descriptions
Medium
Brown ink, brown wash, and white opaque watercolor on white antique laid paper
Dimensions
21.5 x 16.1 cm (8 7/16 x 6 5/16 in.)
framed: 44.5 x 38.4 cm (17 1/2 x 15 1/8 in.)
Inscriptions and Marks
  • collector's mark: verso, lower left, black ink: L. 2426 (Thomas Dimsdale)
  • collector's mark: verso, lower left, purple ink: L. 1880 (Marsden J. Perry)
  • watermark: Horn with shield in crown, with 4 and WR below; related to Heawood 2715 (Amsterdam, 1668)
  • inscription: verso, upper left, graphite: [abstract symbol]
  • inscription: verso, lower center, graphite: 6
  • inscription: verso, lower center, graphite: From the collection of / Thomas Dimsdale, 1758 - 1823
  • inscription: verso, lower right, graphite: yoxm
  • inscription: former mount, brown ink: Remarkably fine drawing by Rembrandt / studies about 1635 / W. R. Valentiner / 1911
Provenance
Thomas Dimsdale, London (L. 2426, verso, lower left). Marsden J. Perry, Providence, RI (L. 1880, verso, lower left). [Duveen Brothers, New York], sold; to Meta and Paul J. Sachs, Cambridge, MA, 1924 (without his mark, L. 2091); Gift of Meta and Paul J. Sachs, 1949.4
Published Text
Catalogue
Drawings from the Age of Bruegel, Rubens, and Rembrandt: Highlights from the Collection of the Harvard Art Museums
Authors
William W. Robinson and Susan Anderson
Publisher
Harvard Art Museums (Cambridge, MA, 2016)

Catalogue entry no. 69 by William W. Robinson:

In his catalogue raisonné of the artist’s drawings, Otto Benesch questioned the attribution of this sheet of studies to Rembrandt because he could not reconcile its technique and presumed date. The fluidity of the lines and breadth of the washes are, Benesch affirmed, characteristic of Rembrandt’s work after 1635, but the old-fashioned ruff worn by the woman at the upper right of the sheet convinced him that the study originated no later than the early thirties.1 Neither the reviewers of his book nor scholars who have subsequently written about the work have shared Benesch’s doubts about Rembrandt’s authorship, although they have not been able to reach a consensus regarding its date.2

Comparison with works executed by Rembrandt around 1638–40 establishes both the autograph status and date of the Harvard drawing. The pen lines resemble the strokes in the figure of a seated woman and the variant sketch of her hair and its ornaments in a preparatory work, now called Studies of a Woman Reading, Seen from Behind, and a Man Wearing a Turban (Fig. 1), for Rembrandt’s 1638 etching Joseph Telling His Dreams.3 The lost profile and decorated hair of the head at the lower right of the Harvard drawing recall the heads of seated women in Joseph Telling His Dreams and another print, Death of the Virgin, the latter dated 1639.4 A study in the Musée du Louvre of a mother holding her child (Fig. 2), datable to around 1640, shares several technical traits with the Harvard sheet.5 Compare particularly the hatchings in areas of shadow and the strokes that describe the hair. Finally, the integration of white opaque watercolor for broad pictorial effects, as in the head at the lower right, occurs in other drawings of the later 1630s.6

Rembrandt executed the Harvard study primarily as a detailed record of the strikingly dressed and decorated hair of a young girl. The etchings cited above, among other works, attest to the expressive role of imaginatively arranged female hair in Rembrandt’s art of the 1630s, so it is no surprise that this real-life example caught his eye. Marieke de Winkel notes that the artist evidently drew the girl while she was being dressed because she wears a nachthalsdoek (peignoir), which women and girls wore during their toilette. In all three studies, he recorded the headband that gathered the hair in the back and the forelock that was pulled over it and plaited at the top. Other plaits hang loose at the side and back of her head.7 Ben Broos has tentatively proposed that the child depicted in the drawing might be Antje van Loo, a niece and goddaughter of Rembrandt’s wife, Saskia van Uylenburgh. In 1641, Antje’s father traveled from Friesland to Amsterdam to attend the baptism of Titus van Rijn, the son of Rembrandt and Saskia, and Broos has identified this visit as the probable occasion of Rembrandt’s drawing.8 That Rembrandt drew the child during her toilette might, as Marieke de Winkel has observed, support the hypothesis that she was a relative whom the artist could have seen during such a private moment.9 However appealing, Broos’s suggestion is speculative, as he concedes. While documents confirm that Antje’s father was present at the baptism of Titus, we do not know whether his six-year-old daughter accompanied him. It is uncertain that Rembrandt executed the drawing in 1641. The dating of the study to that year depends in part on its association with a 1641 double portrait of Cornelis Claesz. Anslo and his wife, Aeltje Schouten, which is doubtful (see below). Finally, there is nothing about the girl’s hairdo and costume that would identify her as Frisian, although, as De Winkel pointed out, elite Frisians such as the Van Loo family would not in any case have worn regional costume.10

The head of an older woman in the Harvard study has been related to the Anslo–Schouten double portrait mentioned above.11 There, Aeltje Schouten wears a similar cap, as well as the type of collar worn by the woman in the drawing. Yet the resemblance of Aeltje to the woman in the Harvard sketch is probably coincidental—neither the facial features nor the positions of the heads correspond—so the drawing should not be considered a preliminary study for the portrait.12 Like the drawings of the girl’s hair, it is most likely a sketch from life.

Notes

1 Otto Benesch, The Drawings of Rembrandt (Oxford, 1954–57), vol. 2, cat. A10. Benesch tentatively suggested an attribution to Jan Lievens or Jacob Backer.

2 See the reviews of Benesch by J. G. van Gelder, “[Review] The Drawings of Rembrandt by Otto Benesch,” The Burlington Magazine, vol. 97, no. 633 (Dec. 1955): 395–96, p. 396; I. Q. van Regteren Altena, “Boekbespreking [Review]: Otto Benesch: The Drawings of Rembrandt; First Complete Edition in Six Volumes. Vol. I–II,” Oud Holland, vol. 70 (1955): 118–20, p. 120; Jakob Rosenberg, “Review of Otto Benesch, The Drawings of Rembrandt, Vols. I–II,” The Art Bulletin, vol. 38, no. 1 (Summer 1956): 63–70, p. 69; Werner Sumowski, “Bemerkungen zu Otto Beneschs Corpus der Rembrandt‑Zeichnungen I,” Wissenschaftliche Zeitschrift der Humbolt‑Universität zu Berlin, Gesellschafts‑ und sprachwissenschaftliche Reihe, vol. 6, no. 4 (1956–57): 255–81, p. 261; J. G. van Gelder, “[Review] The Drawings of Rembrandt: First Complete Edition in Six Volumes by Otto Benesch,” The Burlington Magazine, vol. 103, no. 697 (April 1961): 149–51, p. 151 (n. 13); and Egbert Haverkamp-Begemann, “Rezension: Otto Benesch; The drawings of Rembrandt,” Kunstchronik, vol. 14, no. 1: 10–28; no. 2: 50–57; no. 3 (1961): 85–91, p. 90. More recently, Franklin Robinson (Seventeenth-Century Dutch Drawings from American Collections, Washington, DC: National Gallery of Art; Denver: Denver Art Museum; Fort Worth, TX: Kimbell Art Museum. 1977, cat. 32), Julia Lloyd Williams (Rembrandt’s Women, Edinburgh: National Galleries of Scotland; London: Royal Academy of Arts, 2001, cat. 96), and Clifford Ackley (Rembrandt’s Journey: Painter, Draftsman, Etcher, Boston: Museum of Fine Arts; Chicago: Art Institute of Chicago, 2003, cat. 102), have accepted the drawing as Rembrandt’s work. The dates assigned to the drawing range from circa 1634–36 (Jakob Rosenberg, Felice Stampfle, and Egbert Haverkamp-Begemann in Rembrandt Drawings from American Collections, New York: Pierpont Morgan Library; Cambridge: Fogg Art Museum, 1960, cat. 21, pp. 20–21) to 1640–45 (Sumowski, Lloyd Williams, and Ackley). Seymour Slive, “Rembrandt at Harvard,” Apollo, vol. 107, no. 196 (June 1978): 452–63, pp. 455–56, dated the work—correctly, in my view—to circa 1636–39.

3 Rembrandt van Rijn, Studies of a Woman Reading, Seen from Behind, and a Man Wearing a Turban (Fig. 1). Brown ink and brown wash on yellowish prepared paper. 139 × 125 mm. New York, Private Collection. Otto Benesch, The Drawings of Rembrandt, enlarged and edited by Eva Benesch (Oxford, 1973), vol. 1, cat. 168. Martin Royalton‑Kisch and Peter Schatborn, “The Core Group of Rembrandt Drawings, II: The List,” in Master Drawings, vol. 49, no. 3 (Fall 2011): 323–46, cat. 41, p. 336. Both figures are reproduced in reverse in the signed and dated etching Joseph Telling His Dreams, 1638 (B. 37).

4 Julia Lloyd Williams (cat. 96, p. 177) compared the head at lower right in the drawing to that of a seated woman at lower right in the etching Death of the Virgin, 1639 (B. 99).

5 Rembrandt van Rijn, Seated Woman with a Child on Her Knees (Fig. 2). Brown ink. 160 × 136 mm. Paris, Musée du Louvre, Département des Arts Graphiques, RF 4677, recto. Benesch (1973), vol. 2, cat. 275; Peter Schatborn, Rembrandt (Paris, 2006), pl. 22.

6 See, for example, A Bird of Paradise and Head of a Man Wearing a Turban, Portrait of Maria Trip, 1639, and Two Studies of a Bird of Paradise; Benesch (1973), vol. 1, cat. 158, and vol. 2, cats. 442 and 456.

7 Marieke de Winkel, email to the author, 23 January 2012.

8 Benjamin P. J. Broos, Het Rembrandt Boek (Zwolle, Netherlands, 2006), p. 176; Benjamin P. J. Broos, “Gerrit van Loo, secretaris van Sint Annaparochie, zwager van Rembrandt,” Fryslân, vol. 14, no. 4 (Dec. 2008): 4–20, p. 19; and Benjamin P. J. Broos, “Rembrandt & Saskia: Recent Research,” Jahrbuch der Berliner Museen, vol. 51, supp. (2009): 9–15, pp. 9 and 14.

9 Marieke de Winkel, email to the author, 23 January 2012.

10 Benjamin Broos (2006, p. 176; 2008, p. 19; and 2009, p. 14; Benjamin Broos, Saskia: De vrouw van Rembrandt, Leeuwarden: Historisch Centrum, 2012, p. 68) wondered whether the girl’s hairstyle might be Frisian, which would support her identification as Antje van Loo. However, in her email of 23 January 2012 to the author, Marieke de Winkel did not see anything Frisian about either the hairstyle or costume and noted that the Frisian elite, to which the Uylenburgh and Van Loo families belonged, would not have worn regional dress.

11 For the painting, see Josua Bruyn et al., A Corpus of Rembrandt Paintings (The Hague and Boston, 1982–2014), vol. 3, cat. A 143. The connection of the Harvard drawing to the Anslo/Schouten portrait was first proposed by Werner Sumowski (p. 261) and elaborated by L. C. J. Frerichs (“De schetsbladen van Rembrandt voor het schilderij van het echtpaar Anslo,” Maandblad Amstelodamum, vol. 56, no. 8, Oct. 1969: 206–11, pp. 206–10).

12 That the head on the Harvard sheet could be a study for the portrait was doubted by Felice Stampfle and Egbert Haverkamp-Begemann in Rosenberg et al., cat. 21, pp. 20–21; Egbert Haverkamp-Begemann, “The Present State of Rembrandt Studies,” The Art Bulletin, vol. 53, no. 1 (March 1971): 88–104, p. 96; Bruyn et al., vol. 3, under no. A 143, p. 412, and Julia Lloyd Williams, cat. 96, p. 177. Franklin Robinson (cat. 32, p. 35) wrote that the head of the older woman was “executed in a different ink” and “may be by another hand.” However, the ink in the study of the older woman behaves under infrared light exactly as do the thinner, lighter lines that constitute the initial sketch in the studies of the girl. While not definitive proof that Rembrandt used the same ink for all the studies on the sheet, the infrared examination disqualifies the assertion that the older woman was drawn in a different ink. Her head was not worked up with the darker ink, wash, and white opaque watercolor, and so appears lighter and less finished. My thanks to Penley Knipe for examining the drawing under infrared light and interpreting her observations. H. R. Hoetink (“Nog een portret van Margaretha de Geer,” in Miscellanea I. Q. van Regteren Altena 6/V/1969, Amsterdam, 1969: 150–51 and 341, pp. 150–51) implausibly proposed to identify the woman in this small sketch as Margaretha de Geer, whom Rembrandt painted in the 1660s.

Figures
Acquisition and Rights
Credit Line
Harvard Art Museums/Fogg Museum, Gift of Meta and Paul J. Sachs
Accession Year
1949
Object Number
1949.4
Division
European and American Art
Contact
am_europeanamerican@harvard.edu
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Publication History

Ella S. Siple, "The Fogg Museum of Art at Harvard", The Burlington Magazine (June 1927), vol. 50, no. 291, pp. 309-17, p. 309, repr. p. 307, fig. C

Margaret Scott, An Exhibition of Old-Master Drawings for the Benefit of Public Health Nursing Milk and Emergency Fund, exh. cat., Junior League (Pittsburgh, 1933), cat. no. 9, p. 11

Otto Benesch, Rembrandt Werk und Forschung, Gilhofer & Ranschburg (Vienna, 1935), pp. 22-23

Art in New England: Paintings Drawings Prints from Private Collections in New England, exh. cat., Museum of Fine Arts, Boston (1939), cat. no. 198, pp. 111-12, repr. pl. 86, fig. 198

Agnes Mongan and Paul J. Sachs, Drawings in the Fogg Museum of Art, Harvard University Press (Cambridge, 1940), vol. 1, cat. no. 524, p. 276, repr. vol. 2, fig. 271

"The Cover", American Artist (1951), vol. XV, no. 1, cover and p. 12, p. 12, repr. cover

An Exhibition of Dutch and Flemish Drawings and Watercolors, checklist, Unpublished (1954), cat. no. 48, p. 12

Otto Benesch, The Drawings of Rembrandt, Phaidon Press (Oxford, 1954 - 1957), vol. 2, cat. no. A10, repr. fig. 581 (as possibly Lievens or Backer)

Jan Gerrit van Gelder, "[Review] The Drawings of Rembrandt by Otto Benesch" (December 1955), vol. 97, no. 633, pp. 395-396, p. 396

I. Q. van Regteren Altena, "Boekbespreking: Otto Benesch. The Drawings of Rembrandt. First Complete Edition in Six Volumes. Vol. I-II.", Oud Holland (1955), vol. 70, pp. 118-120, p. 120

Werner Sumowski, "Bemerkungen zu Otto Beneschs Corpus der Rembrandt-Zeichnungen I", Wissenschaftliche Zeitschrift der Humbolt-Universität zu Berlin, Gesellschafts- und sprachwissenschaftliche Reihe (1956-1957), vol. 6, no. 4, pp. 255-81, p. 261

Jakob Rosenberg, Review of Otto Benesch, "The Drawings of Rembrandt," vols. I-II, The Art Bulletin (March 1956), vol. 38, no. 1, pp. 63-70, p. 69

James Watrous, The Craft of Old-Master Drawings, University of Wisconsin Press (Madison, WI, 1957), repr. p. 49

Felice Stampfle and Egbert Haverkamp-Begemann, Rembrandt Drawings from American Collections, exh. cat., The Morgan Library & Museum (New York, NY, 1960), cat. no. 21, pp. 20-21, repr. pl. 17, fig. 21

Jan Gerrit van Gelder, "Review: The Drawings of Rembrandt. First Complete Edition in Six Volumes by Otto Benesch", Burlington Magazine (April 1961), vol. 103, no. 697, pp. 149-151, p. 151 (n. 13)

Egbert Haverkamp-Begemann, "Rezension: Otto Benesch. The drawings of Rembrandt.", Kunstchronik (1961), vol. 14, no. 1, pp. 10-28; no. 2, pp. 50-57, no. 3, pp. 85-91, p. 90

Phyllis Pray Bober, ed., Masters of Seven Centuries: Paintings and Drawings from the 14th to 20th Century, exh. cat., Wildenstein Gallery, New York (New York, 1962), cat. no. 18, p. 16, repr. p. 32, fig. 18

Ernst W. Watson and Aldren A. Watson, Watson Drawing Book, Reinhold Publishing Co. (New York, NY, 1962), repr. p. 114, fig. 172

Fogg Art Museum, Studies and Study Sheets: Master Drawings from Five Centuries, exh. cat., Fogg Art Museum (Cambridge, MA, 1964), cat. no. 32, n.p.

Agnes Mongan, Memorial Exhibition: Works of Art from the Collection of Paul J. Sachs [1878-1965]: given and bequeathed to the Fogg Art Museum, Harvard University, Cambridge, Massachusetts, exh. cat., Harvard University (Cambridge, MA, 1965), cat. no. 23, n.p., repr., and p. 206

L. C. J. Frederichs, "De Schetsbladen van Rembrandt Voor Het Schilderij van Het Echtpaar Anslo" (Amsterdam, October 1969), vol. 56, no. 8, pp. 206-211, pp. 206-210, repr. p. 207

H. R. Hoetink, "Nog een portret van Margaretha de Geer", Miscellanea I. Q. van Regteren Altena 6/V/1969, Scheltema & Holkema (Amsterdam, 1969), pp. 150-51, 341, pp. 150-51, repr. p. 341, fig. 1

Pieter Jacobus Johannes van Thiel, Rembrandt 1669/1969, exh. cat. (1969), cat. no. 64, p. 161, repr.

Egbert Haverkamp-Begemann, "The Present State of Rembrandt Studies", The Art Bulletin, College Art Association of America (New York, March 1971), vol. 53, no. 1, pp. 88-104, p. 96

Otto Benesch, The Drawings of Rembrandt [enlarged ed.], Phaidon Press (Oxford, 1973), vol. 2, cat. no. A10, pp. 123-124, repr. fig. 615

Franklin W. Robinson, Seventeenth Century Dutch Drawings from American Collections, exh. cat., International Exhibitions Foundation (Washington, D.C, 1977), cat. no. 32, pp. xvi and 34-36, repr.

Nathan Goldstein, The Art of Responsive Drawing [2nd ed.], Prentice-Hall Press (Englewood Cliffs, NJ, 1977), repr. fig. 11.20

Seymour Slive, "Rembrandt at Harvard", Apollo (June 1978), vol. 107, no. 196, pp. 452-463, pp. 453, 455, and 457, repr. p. 452, fig. 1

Konrad Oberhuber, European Master Drawings of Six Centuries from the Collection of the Fogg Art Museum, exh. cat., National Museum of Western Art (Tokyo, 1979), cat. no. 50, n.p., repr. pl. 50

[Reproduction only], "Calendar", Harvard University Gazette, (December 12, 1980)., repr. p. 8

The Draughtsman at Work. Drawing in the Golden Century of Dutch Art, checklist (unpublished, 1980), no. 3

Nathan Goldstein, The Art of Responsive Drawing, Prentice-Hall Press (Englewood Cliffs, 1984), p. 335, repr. p. 337, fig. 11.21

Josua de Bruyn and Ernst van de Wetering, A Corpus of Rembrandt Paintings: 1635-1642, M. Nijhoff Publishers (The Hague and Boston, MA, 1986), vol. III, p. 412

Peter C. Sutton, A Guide to Dutch Art in America, Netherlands-American Amity Trust and Eerdmans (Washington, D.C. and Grand Rapids, MI, 1986), pp. 40-41, repr. fig. 53

Nathan Goldstein, The Art of Responsive Drawing, Prentice-Hall Press (Englewood Cliffs, 1992), p. 354, repr. p. 12.22

Masterpieces of world art : Fogg Art Museum, Arthur M. Sackler Museum, Busch-Reisinger Museum, 1997

Julia Lloyd Williams, Rembrandt's Women, exh. cat., National Gallery of Scotland (Edinburgh, Scotland, 2001), cat. no. 96, pp. 177 and 257, repr. p. 177

Clifford S. Ackley and Ronni Baer, Rembrandt's Journey: Painter, Draftsman, Etcher, exh. cat., MFA Publications (Boston, 2003), cat. no. 102, pp. 172 and 321, repr. p. 171, fig. 102

Ben Broos, Het Rembrandt Boek, Waanders Uitgevers (Zwolle, The Netherlands, 2006), p. 176, repr.

Ivan Gaskell, Rembrandt and the Aesthetics of Technique, brochure, Harvard University Art Museums (Cambridge, MA, 2006), checklist

Ben Broos, "Gerrit van Loo, secretaris van Sint Annaparochie, zwager van Rembrandt", Fryslân (December 2008), vol. 14, no. 4, pp. 4-20, p. 19, repr.

Ben Broos, "Rembrandt & Saskia: Recent Research", Jahrbuch der Berliner Museen, Gebr. Mann Verlag (Berlin, 2009), vol. 51, supplement, pp. 9-15, pp. 9 and 14, repr. p. 14, fig. 7

Ben Broos, Saskia: De vrouw van Rembrandt, exh. cat., WBOOKS (Zwolle, 2012), p. 66 and repr. p. 96, fig. 88

The Drawings of Rembrandt: a revision of Otto Benesch's catalogue raisonné, website, 2012, Benesch A10

Stijn Alsteens, [Review] William W. Robinson, with Susan Anderson, "Drawings from the Age of Bruegel, Rubens, and Rembrandt: Highlights from the Collection of the Harvard Art Museums", Master Drawings (Winter 2015), LIII, no. 4, pp. 531-534, p. 532, repr. p. 532 as fig. 1

William W. Robinson and Susan Anderson, Drawings from the Age of Bruegel, Rubens, and Rembrandt: Highlights from the Collection of the Harvard Art Museums, exh. cat., Harvard Art Museums (Cambridge, MA, 2016), p. 15; cat. no. 69, pp. 234-236, repr. p. 235; watermark p. 380

Franklin Einspruch, Fuse Visual Art Review: A Pair of Drawing Shows at the Harvard Art Museums, The Arts Fuse ([e-journal], June 9, 2016), http://artsfuse.org/146319/fuse-visual-arts-review-a-pair-of-drawing-shows-at-the-harvard-art-museums/, accessed June 9, 2016

Colleen Walsh, "Connecting with a Masterpiece: Rembrandt Drawing at Harvard Art Museums Offers a Close Look at Artist's Hand", The Harvard Gazette (August 1, 2019), repr., https://news.harvard.edu/gazette/story/2019/08/rembrandt-drawing-offers-a-close-look-at-artists-hand/, accessed August 1, 2019

Peter Schatborn and Erik Hinterding, Rembrandt: The Complete Drawings and Etchings, Taschen (Cologne, 2019), cat. no. D363, p. 236, repr.

Exhibition History

An Exhibition of Old-Master Drawings for the Benefit of Public Health Nursing Milk and Emergency Fund, Junior League, Pittsburgh, 12/13/1933 - 01/06/1934

Art in New England: Paintings, Drawings, Prints from Private Collections in New England, Museum of Fine Arts, Boston, Boston, 06/09/1939 - 09/10/1939

Drawings from the Fogg Museum of Art, Harvard University (Collected by Paul J. Sachs), Century Club, New York, 05/12/1947 - 09/25/1947

An Exhibition of Dutch and Flemish Drawings and Watercolors, Fogg Art Museum, Cambridge, 04/01/1954 - 04/30/1954

Rembrandt Drawings from American Collections, The Morgan Library & Museum, New York, 03/15/1960 - 04/16/1960; Fogg Art Museum, Cambridge, 04/27/1960 - 05/29/1960

Masters of Seven Centuries, Wildenstein & Company, New York, 03/01/1962 - 03/31/1962

Studies and Study Sheets, Fogg Art Museum, Cambridge, 03/26/1964 - 04/18/1964

Memorial Exhibition: Works of Art from the Collection of Paul J. Sachs [1878-1965] Given and Bequeathed to the Fogg Art Museum Harvard University Cambridge, Massachusetts, Fogg Art Museum, Cambridge, 11/15/1965 - 01/15/1966; Museum of Modern Art, New York, New York, 12/19/1966 - 02/26/1967

Taste of a Connoisseur: The Paul J. Sachs Collection, Museum of Modern Art, New York, New York, 12/21/1966 - 02/26/1967

Rembrandt 1669/1969, Rijksprentenkabinet, Rijksmuseum, Amsterdam, 09/13/1969 - 11/30/1969

Seventeenth Century Dutch Drawings from American Collections, National Gallery of Art, Washington, 01/30/1977 - 03/13/1977; Denver Art Museum, Denver, 04/01/1977 - 05/15/1977; Kimbell Art Museum, Fort Worth, 06/01/1977 - 07/15/1977

European Master Drawings of Six Centuries from the Collection of the Fogg Art Museum, National Museum of Western Art, Tokyo, 11/03/1979 - 12/16/1979

The Draughtsman at Work. Drawing in the Golden Century of Dutch Art, Fogg Art Museum, Cambridge, 11/21/1980 - 01/04/1981

Rembrandt: A Selection of his Works, Busch-Reisinger Museum, Cambridge, 10/18/1984 - 12/11/1984

Rembrandt and His School: Drawings from the Museum Boymans-van Beuningen Rotterdam, Arthur M. Sackler Museum, Cambridge, 12/02/1989 - 01/28/1990

The Heavenly Twins: Edward W. Forbes, Paul J. Sachs and the Building of a Collection, Harvard University Art Museums, Cambridge, 09/23/1995 - 12/17/1995

Rembrandt's Women, National Gallery of Scotland, Edinburgh, 06/08/2001 - 09/02/2001; Royal Academy of Arts, London, 09/22/2001 - 12/16/2001

Rembrandt's Journey: Painting, Draftsman, Etcher, Museum of Fine Arts, Boston, Boston, 10/26/2003 - 01/18/2004; The Art Institute of Chicago, Chicago, 02/14/2004 - 05/09/2004

Rembrandt and the Aesthetics of Technique, Harvard University Art Museums, Busch-Reisinger Museum, 09/09/2006 - 12/10/2006

32Q: 2300 Dutch & Flemish, Harvard Art Museums, Cambridge, 07/17/2019 - 11/21/2019

Drawings from the Age of Bruegel, Rubens, and Rembrandt, Harvard Art Museums, Cambridge, 05/21/2016 - 08/14/2016

Subjects and Contexts

Dutch, Flemish, & Netherlandish Drawings

This record has been reviewed by the curatorial staff but may be incomplete. Our records are frequently revised and enhanced. For more information please contact the Division of European and American Art at am_europeanamerican@harvard.edu