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Identification and Creation
Object Number
1977.216.3035
Title
Brick Stamp of T. Greius Ianuarius
Classification
Brick Stamps
Work Type
brick stamp
Date
60-93 CE
Places
Creation Place: Ancient & Byzantine World, Europe, Latium
Period
Roman Imperial period, Early
Culture
Roman
Persistent Link
https://hvrd.art/o/289695
Physical Descriptions
Medium
Terracotta
Technique
Stamped
Dimensions
16.5 x 11.6 x 4.2 cm (6 1/2 x 4 9/16 x 1 5/8 in.)
Inscriptions and Marks
  • inscription: Inscription: T GREI IANVARI EX F C D [d] / V Q F
Provenance
Acquired by Henry W. Haynes in or near Rome, c. 1877.
Bequest of Henry W. Haynes to Department of the Classics, 1912.
Transfer from Department of the Classics, 1977.
Acquisition and Rights
Credit Line
Harvard Art Museums/Arthur M. Sackler Museum, Transfer from the Department of the Classics, Harvard University, Bequest of Henry W. Haynes, 1912
Accession Year
1977
Object Number
1977.216.3035
Division
Asian and Mediterranean Art
Contact
am_asianmediterranean@harvard.edu
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Descriptions
Description
Upper Line: v(aleat) q(ui) f(ecit)
Lower Line: T. Grei Ianuari ex f(igilinis) C(aninianis) d(uorum) D(omitiorum)
("May the person who made (this) be well! (brick) of Titus Greius Ianuarius, from the Caninian brickyards belonging to the two Domitii.")

The last D had been broken off but may be supplied from other copies of this stamp. The family of the Domitii owned brickyards around Rome and this master, T. Greius Ianuarius, worked between 60 and 93 CE for two brothers, adopted sons of Domitius Afer (d. 59 CE). The grand-daughter of one was the mother of the emperor Marcus Aurelius, who thus inherited the yards, perhaps about 155 CE. Pieces of brick were used to face concrete walls and stamps such as this one therefore serve to date the construction of buildings.
Commentary
LIVE LIKE A ROMAN: DAILY LIFE OBJECT COLLECTION

Pieces of brick were used to face concrete walls, and stamps such as this one therefore serve to date the construction of buildings.

Most brick stamps were rectangular and made of bronze. The letters were often in all capitals, cast in raised relief. Stamps were used for marking a wide variety of materials, such as bricks, amphorae, tiles, lamps, and other ceramic vessels. Sometimes even bread was stamped. Though the Greeks were known to stamp tiles, most of the evidence for the rise of Roman stamps comes from the third century BCE.

The stamp would usually name the maker or exporter of the product, as seen with the COSSINI EVTVCHIANI stamp in this collection. The name of the person is in the genitive case to show possession.


The family of the Domitii owned brickyards around Rome and this master, T. Greius Ianuarius, worked between 60 and 93 CE for two brothers, adopted sons of Domitius Afer (d. 59 AD). The grand-daughter of one was the mother of the emperor Marcus Aurelius, who thus inherited the yards, perhaps about 155 CE.

This record has been reviewed by the curatorial staff but may be incomplete. Our records are frequently revised and enhanced. For more information please contact the Division of Asian and Mediterranean Art at am_asianmediterranean@harvard.edu