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Identification and Creation
Object Number
2013.71
Title
Buddhist Priest's Robe (Kesa) with Scrolling Floral
Classification
Textile Arts
Work Type
costume
Date
late 18th century
Places
Creation Place: East Asia, Japan
Period
Edo period, 1615-1868
Culture
Japanese
Persistent Link
https://hvrd.art/o/211562
Physical Descriptions
Medium
Dark blue silk with "kinran" gold brocade; selected elements made of orange silk with supplementary gold wefts
Dimensions
H. 113.7 x W. 230.2 cm (44 3/4 x 90 5/8 in.)
Provenance
[Yamanaka and Company, Kyoto, by 1926?], sold; to Louis V. Ledoux Collection, New York (1926?-1948), by descent; to his son L. Pierre Ledoux, New York (1948-2001), by inheritance; to his widow Joan F. Ledoux, New York, (2001-2013), gift; to Harvard Art Museums, 2013.

Footnotes:
1. Louis V. Ledoux (1880-1948)
2. L. Pierre Ledoux (1912-2001)
3. On long term loan to Harvard Art Museums from 1985 to 2013.
Acquisition and Rights
Credit Line
Harvard Art Museums/Arthur M. Sackler Museum, The Louis V. Ledoux Collection; Gift of Mrs. L. Pierre Ledoux in memory of her husband
Accession Year
2013
Object Number
2013.71
Division
Asian and Mediterranean Art
Contact
am_asianmediterranean@harvard.edu
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Descriptions
Description
A Buddhist priest's robe known in Japan as a kesa (Sanskrit, kasaya), this rectangular garment is made up of mulitple pieces of the same cloth that together form a unified assemblage of rectangles and squares framed within a border. The fabric is a very dark blue silk with a design of densely packed flowers and vines brocaded in gold. Four square patches made of a contrasting salmon-colored silk decorated with gold designs of phoenixes flying amid clouds appear in the four corners, just inside the robe's rectangular border. Termed "shiten," these four corner patches are said to represent the Buddhist Guardians of the Four Directions (Shitennō).

This record has been reviewed by the curatorial staff but may be incomplete. Our records are frequently revised and enhanced. For more information please contact the Division of Asian and Mediterranean Art at am_asianmediterranean@harvard.edu