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Identification and Creation
Object Number
2002.50.50
Title
Bowl with Standing Figure
Classification
Vessels
Work Type
vessel
Date
10th century
Places
Creation Place: Middle East, Iran, Nishapur
Period
Samanid period
Persistent Link
https://hvrd.art/o/165397
Physical Descriptions
Medium
Buff-colored earthenware covered in pinkish slip and painted with black (manganese and iron), red (iron), yellow (lead-tin), and green (copper) under clear lead glaze
Technique
Underglazed, painted
Dimensions
8.1 x 21 cm (3 3/16 x 8 1/4 in.)
Provenance
Stanford and Norma Jean Calderwood, Belmont, MA (by 1974-2002), gift; to Harvard Art Museums, 2002.
Acquisition and Rights
Credit Line
Harvard Art Museums/Arthur M. Sackler Museum, The Norma Jean Calderwood Collection of Islamic Art
Accession Year
2002
Object Number
2002.50.50
Division
Asian and Mediterranean Art
Contact
am_asianmediterranean@harvard.edu
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Descriptions
Description
Examination under ultraviolet light reveals that almost two-thirds of this bowl has been overpainted. Happily, most of the large standing figure, from the top of the flattened head to the tip of the pointed shoes, is original. Details of the garment, such as neckline, lapels, and pattern of the skirt, are original ceramic surface. The figure’s shoulders and upper arms have been repainted, as has the leafy projection from the piece of fruit he or she holds in an upraised hand. The bird on the left is mostly original, but the other is overpainted, as is almost eighty percent of the upper walls and rim. The exterior is also heavily resurfaced.

Published Catalogue Text: In Harmony: The Norma Jean Calderwood Collection of Islamic Art , written 2013
18

Bowl with standing figure
Iran, Nishapur, Samanid period, 10th century,[1] with significant areas of modern overpainting
Buff-colored earthenware covered in pinkish slip and painted with black (manganese and iron), red (iron), yellow (lead-tin), and green (copper) under clear lead glaze
8.1 × 21 cm (3 3/16 × 8 1/4 in.)
2002.50.50

Published: McWilliams 2003, 227, 231, fig. 8; McWilliams 2004, 11.

Examination under ultraviolet light reveals that almost two-thirds of this bowl has been overpainted. Happily, most of the large standing figure, from the top of the flattened head to the tip of the pointed shoes, is original. Details of the garment, such as neckline, lapels, and pattern of the skirt, are original ceramic surface. The figure’s shoulders and upper arms have been repainted, as has the leafy projection from the piece of fruit he or she holds in an upraised hand.[2] The bird on the left is mostly original, but the other is overpainted, as is almost eighty percent of the upper walls and rim. The exterior is also heavily resurfaced.

Mary McWilliams

[1] The bowl was last fired between 700 and 1100 years ago, according to the results of thermoluminescence analysis carried out by Oxford Authentication Ltd. in 2004.
[2] See, in this catalogue, Oya Pancaroğlu’s essay, “Feasts of Nishapur: Cultural Resonances of Tenth-Century Ceramic Production in Khurasan,” 25–35.

Publication History

Mary McWilliams, ed., In Harmony: The Norma Jean Calderwood Collection of Islamic Art, exh. cat., Harvard Art Museums (Cambridge, MA, 2013), p. 30, cat. 18, ill.; p. 182, cat. 18, ill.

Exhibition History

Closely Focused, Intensely Felt: Selections from the Norma Jean Calderwood Collection of Islamic Art, Harvard University Art Museums, Cambridge, 08/07/2004 - 01/02/2005

Re-View: Arts of India & the Islamic Lands, Harvard Art Museums/Arthur M. Sackler Museum, Cambridge, 04/26/2008 - 06/01/2013

In Harmony: The Norma Jean Calderwood Collection of Islamic Art, Harvard Art Museums, Cambridge, 01/31/2013 - 06/01/2013

This record has been reviewed by the curatorial staff but may be incomplete. Our records are frequently revised and enhanced. For more information please contact the Division of Asian and Mediterranean Art at am_asianmediterranean@harvard.edu