Photo © President and Fellows of Harvard College
Identification and Creation
Object Number
1937.15
People
Jamal Ibn Muhammad
Title
Virgin and Child with Two Angels
Classification
Albums
Work Type
album folio
Date
c. 1630-1650
Places
Creation Place: South Asia, India
Period
Mughal period
Culture
Indian
Persistent Link
https://hvrd.art/o/216894
Physical Descriptions
Medium
Ink, opaque watercolor, and gold on paper
Dimensions
17.8 x 10.2 cm (7 x 4 in.)
Inscriptions and Marks
  • Signed: "Work of Jamal Ibn Muhammad"
  • inscription: Language: Persian
    Script: Nasta’liq
    عمل جمال محمد
    Amal Jamal Muhammad
    Work of/Made by Jamal Muhammad
Acquisition and Rights
Credit Line
Harvard Art Museums/Arthur M. Sackler Museum, Gift of Grenville L. Winthrop, Class of 1886
Accession Year
1937
Object Number
1937.15
Division
Asian and Mediterranean Art
Contact
am_asianmediterranean@harvard.edu
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Descriptions
Description
In the foreground of the painting is a large Virgin Mary holding the Christ Child at the bank of a river. The Christ Child clutches onto a book with his left hand, while his right hand plays with an emerald from the Virgin’s necklace. Floating about them, against a marbled sky, are two angels. Bedecked with pearls and jewels, the one on the left carries a tray, while the one on the right carries a gold, bejeweled crown.

On the left is a domed complex that resembles a Muslim mausoleum. Towards the bottom left is a large group of people; some of them are robed and turbaned, while others simply wear loin cloths and have shaved heads. One turbaned and robed figure is seated on a mat surrounded by several standards, including the trishul, the Hindu god Shiva’s trident, suggesting that some of the figures may be Shaivite ascetics. The robed and bearded figures, especially those with fur-trimmed hats, are ascetics that belong to Sufism, the mystical branch of Islam.

The thick, outer margin is decorated with a variety of colorful flowering plants, including roses, irises, tulips, and daffodils. The inner border framing the painting is blue with gold scrolling flowers and leaves. The painting is mostly black ink on cream paper that has been pasted into the decorative borders.
Exhibition History

Eyes to the East: Indian, Persian, and Turkish Art Given by Harvard Graduates, Harvard University Art Museums, Cambridge, 09/22/1990 - 11/25/1990

Linear Graces ... and Disgraces: Part II, Drawings from the Courts of Persia, Turkey, and India, 15th-19th Centuries, Harvard University Art Museums, Cambridge, 12/26/1994 - 03/05/1995

This record was created from historic documentation and may not have been reviewed by a curator; it may be inaccurate or incomplete. Our records are frequently revised and enhanced. For more information please contact the Division of Asian and Mediterranean Art at am_asianmediterranean@harvard.edu